• strict warning: Non-static method view::load_views() should not be called statically in /home/conserva/public_html/sites/all/modules/views/views.module on line 864.
  • strict warning: Non-static method view::db_objects() should not be called statically in /home/conserva/public_html/sites/all/modules/views/includes/view.inc on line 1417.
  • strict warning: Declaration of views_handler_argument::init() should be compatible with views_handler::init(&$view, $options) in /home/conserva/public_html/sites/all/modules/views/handlers/views_handler_argument.inc on line 744.
  • strict warning: Declaration of views_handler_filter::options_validate() should be compatible with views_handler::options_validate($form, &$form_state) in /home/conserva/public_html/sites/all/modules/views/handlers/views_handler_filter.inc on line 607.
  • strict warning: Declaration of views_handler_filter::options_submit() should be compatible with views_handler::options_submit($form, &$form_state) in /home/conserva/public_html/sites/all/modules/views/handlers/views_handler_filter.inc on line 607.
  • strict warning: Declaration of views_handler_filter_node_status::operator_form() should be compatible with views_handler_filter::operator_form(&$form, &$form_state) in /home/conserva/public_html/sites/all/modules/views/modules/node/views_handler_filter_node_status.inc on line 13.
  • strict warning: Declaration of views_plugin_style_default::options() should be compatible with views_object::options() in /home/conserva/public_html/sites/all/modules/views/plugins/views_plugin_style_default.inc on line 24.
  • strict warning: Declaration of views_plugin_row::options_validate() should be compatible with views_plugin::options_validate(&$form, &$form_state) in /home/conserva/public_html/sites/all/modules/views/plugins/views_plugin_row.inc on line 134.
  • strict warning: Declaration of views_plugin_row::options_submit() should be compatible with views_plugin::options_submit(&$form, &$form_state) in /home/conserva/public_html/sites/all/modules/views/plugins/views_plugin_row.inc on line 134.
  • user warning: Table './conserva_drupal/cache_filter' is marked as crashed and should be repaired query: SELECT data, created, headers, expire, serialized FROM cache_filter WHERE cid = '2:1abd8c4b79c1ff2160e854ce1ce6504f' in /home/conserva/public_html/includes/cache.inc on line 27.
  • user warning: Table './conserva_drupal/cache_filter' is marked as crashed and should be repaired query: UPDATE cache_filter SET data = '<p>SUZANNE FIELDS: September 6, 2019</p>\n<p>Saying goodbye is never easy. Every school child quotes &ldquo;Parting is such sweet sorrow&rdquo; from &ldquo;Romeo and Juliet,&rdquo; which has become a sentimental cliche. But the sentiment captures the memories that sustain my final column. I am saying goodbye to all my readers who stayed with me through these changing times and wrote lively letters with both appreciation and argument for my opinions. We&rsquo;ve had a rewarding give-and-take in these days of dogmatic pontification.<br />\n But the times they are a-changin&rsquo;.</p>\n<p> I WAS introduced as a conservative columnist in the Washington Times in 1984, writing from that famous intersection of politics and culture in the nation&rsquo;s capital, where I promised not to get run over in the heavy traffic.<br />\n I had just written an op-ed piece for the Washington Post saying that the sexual revolution had gone too far in eliminating many of the more intimate decencies between a man and a woman. While women were grateful for much of the liberation that flowed from it, the sexual revolution made it possible for many men to live out their sexual fantasies of promiscuity and irresponsibility at the expense of women&rsquo;s feelings.<br />\n That argument was controversial in the 1980s, but only recently, in discussing the changing values that led to the protection of sexual predator Jeffrey Epstein, Lisa Miller observed in New York magazine, &ldquo;the sexual revolution gave the elites and the circles orbiting them intellectual permission to downgrade sexual violence to a matter of taste.&rdquo; It didn&rsquo;t take long for the acceptable definition of eros to degrade women and girls without significant distinctions between preferences, perversions and crimes. &nbsp;<br />\n Every revolution pushes a pendulum; we&rsquo;re unlikely to decide where the center ought to be until that pendulum has swung too far.<br />\n Lots of pendulums in politics and culture today have swung too far. In the summer of our discontent, conversations are dominated by the way the two political parties attack each other with nastiness and prejudice, snark and snide. While we should be plotting ways to improve education, eliminate lingering racism and confront the complexities of immigration, we exacerbate the problems with rancorous debate feeding ideological appetites.<br />\n Wesley Pruden, columnist and former editor-in-chief of The Washington Times, who was responsible for getting me into the business of &ldquo;columny,&rdquo; died in July. We often talked about the decline of journalism and appreciation for &ldquo;the facts, just the facts&rdquo; in news stories. Today, many news stories read like opinion columns, and language doesn&rsquo;t count for much unless it&rsquo;s shrill, vulgar and angry. He worried that the internet would destroy the printed word, but he was doing his best to hold the line. Now he&rsquo;s moved on to that Great Newsroom in the Sky reserved for dedicated editors, reporters and columnists, and that line is weaker.</p>\n<p> LIKE MY former editor, I&rsquo;ve been disheartened by the disregard for facts, civility and common sense in much that passes for serious debate, but I will now leave that good fight to others.<br />\n In my column, I&rsquo;ve been hard on radical feminists who &ldquo;pour new whine into old battles,&rdquo; alarmed by the &ldquo;snowflakes&rdquo; who pollute the groves of academe with politically correct politics and dismayed by the president&rsquo;s omniscient tweets that raise the temperature on almost every issue. The political divide has meshed with a sexual divide as conservative and liberal values are seen through the prism of acrimonious argument. But my favorite issues have focused on family, the importance of a mother and father, reviving memories of my parents.<br />\n My daddy came from Pinsk, the Russian city many Jews fled at the turn of the century, and I grew up in the kind of immigrant Jewish family you don&rsquo;t hear much about anymore. My grandparents and parents were thrilled to be Americans, to learn English and become citizens. They loved reciting the Pledge of Allegiance, singing &ldquo;The Star-Spangled Banner&rdquo; and listening to Kate Smith sing &ldquo;God Bless America.&rdquo; My daddy was a bookmaker and sports promoter whose amateur athletic prowess in sandlot ball was bequeathed to his great-grandson Alex Bregman, the third baseman for the Houston Astros, who fulfilled his American Dream.<br />\n When I write about the tragedy of fatherless families, I reflect on my good fortune in being able to see the complementary values and virtues of a father and a mother, and the loving sacrifices both make in different ways. It&rsquo;s no longer trendy to talk about sex differences in our &ldquo;gender-neutral&rdquo; culture, another pendulum that has swung too far.</p>\n<p> WE LIVE IN difficult times, and as my daddy used to say, &ldquo;Tough times make a monkey eat red pepper.&rdquo; Lots of people eat red pepper today. The forces of evil and terror wind deeply and destroy with enormous power. But my column has always meant to show how the darker forces ultimately have no power to destroy the human spirit.</p>\n<p> Write to Suzanne Fields at <a href=\"mailto:suzannefields2000@gmail.com\">suzannefields2000@gmail.com</a>. Suzanne Fields is currently working on a book that will revisit John Milton&rsquo;s &ldquo;Paradise Lost.&rdquo;</p>\n<p> &nbsp;</p>\n', created = 1575647810, expire = 1575734210, headers = '', serialized = 0 WHERE cid = '2:1abd8c4b79c1ff2160e854ce1ce6504f' in /home/conserva/public_html/includes/cache.inc on line 112.
  • user warning: Table './conserva_drupal/cache_filter' is marked as crashed and should be repaired query: SELECT data, created, headers, expire, serialized FROM cache_filter WHERE cid = '2:ef0075478f570ee95d0f48a75d44dec8' in /home/conserva/public_html/includes/cache.inc on line 27.
  • user warning: Table './conserva_drupal/cache_filter' is marked as crashed and should be repaired query: UPDATE cache_filter SET data = '<p>PARENTAL LEAVE: June 14, 2019</p>\n<p>Bonding with a newborn baby isn&rsquo;t just women&rsquo;s work any longer. Men now say, &ldquo;What&rsquo;s good for the goose is good for the gander.&rdquo; Fathers want in on parental leave.<br />\n New daddies have no tell-tale stretch marks or breasts overflowing with warm milk, but it&rsquo;s a sign of the times that increasing numbers of them demand paternity leave to spend as much time with their newborn son or daughter as the baby&rsquo;s mom (as practically difficult as that may be). They&rsquo;re calling it an equal rights issue, and support is coming from surprising people in surprising places, including Republicans and the banking industry with, it must be said, an &ldquo;assist&rdquo; from the courts.</p>\n<p> THE ISSUE was given a powerful Daddy&rsquo;s Day push when JP Morgan Chase, the banking behemoth, said it would pay $5 million to settle a class-action lawsuit filed on behalf of male employees for them to enjoy the same access to parental leave as new mothers. Given the size and scope of this settlement, the impact may be more far-reaching than earlier legal fights when gander wanted what the goose was having.<br />\n Such demands would have been mocked by men of our grandfathers&rsquo; generation, for whom changing a diaper was de-masculinizing. The times they have changed. Not only do more mothers work outside the house; they also demand more from fathers inside the house. Gender-neutral parental policies are suddenly said to be good for mom, the baby and business, too.<br />\n Parental leave is something that many businesses have found to be helpful for recruiting and maintaining qualified men and women in the era of the two-paycheck family, but it reduces staff churn as well. Staff turnover at office or factory is costly and disruptive.<br />\n Ivanka Trump, the president&rsquo;s daughter and adviser, makes parental leave one of her causes. She&rsquo;s a mother of three, and her wealth has not burdened her with the child care problems men and women of lesser means confront. Nevertheless, she knows firsthand the intensive, as well as loving, demands required of both parents when a new baby arrives. New research supports what used to be merely observation. When both loving parents are involved, babies thrive.</p>\n<p> SO POWERFUL is nature that a belief that was once an old wives&rsquo; tale took hold: That the face of a newborn baby resembles the father. Now researchers say that&rsquo;s not necessarily so, however reassuring it may be to dear old Dad. &ldquo;Independent of whether the baby actually looks like Dad is the perception that the baby shares resemblance with Dad,&rdquo; evolutionary psychologist Steven Platek, who studies the issue, tells The Atlantic magazine.<br />\n What nature doesn&rsquo;t confirm absolutely Congress can encourage, which is why prominent Republican senators like Marco Rubio, Joni Ernst, Mike Lee and Bill Cassidy are behind what they see as a winning issue, supporting the nurture of newborns through paid parental leave.<br />\n Sen. Rubio&rsquo;s plan, introduced in March, enables new parents to exchange a three- to six-month delay in receiving prospective Social Security payments for parental leave, or reduced Social Security payments later. &ldquo;This is an approach that provides people an option to utilize their own benefits by pulling them forward and to do so without growing government,&rdquo; he says.<br />\n Joni Ernst and Mike Lee prefer their CRADLE Act &mdash; &ldquo;Child Rearing and Development Leave Empowerment&rdquo; &mdash; which also uses Social Security funds but provides even stronger incentives for parents to spend time at home with the child. Democrats say it&rsquo;s unfair to choose between retirement benefits and family leave; they prefer a payroll tax funding up to 12 weeks of paid family leave, sponsored by Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand of New York.<br />\n Naturally, all the numbers at this point are fuzzy, but it&rsquo;s quite remarkable that some Republicans and Democrats can even see the potential for compromise on behalf of an issue that was once as polarizing as today&rsquo;s politics. Sen. Rubio thinks his approach, while far from perfect, has a chance of becoming law, which no government-mandated program does. He, like the other senators, makes the point that the United States is the only country that has no paid parental leave.<br />\n Several new children&rsquo;s books put daddy at center stage with a young daughter and son, assuming changes in attitude toward daddy&rsquo;s responsibilities. No kiss goodbye at the door when he goes off to work. Instead, Daddy&rsquo;s a one-man playground, a mountain to climb, a horsey to ride, even a construction crane scooping up baby in his powerful cradle. These fathers get to build castles in the sand rather than storm the beaches.</p>\n<p> LIKE EVERYTHING else, the father-child relationship is determined by many things, including when and where you&rsquo;re born on the timeline of history. Happy Father&rsquo;s Day.</p>\n', created = 1575647810, expire = 1575734210, headers = '', serialized = 0 WHERE cid = '2:ef0075478f570ee95d0f48a75d44dec8' in /home/conserva/public_html/includes/cache.inc on line 112.
  • user warning: Table './conserva_drupal/cache_filter' is marked as crashed and should be repaired query: SELECT data, created, headers, expire, serialized FROM cache_filter WHERE cid = '2:18d564b6dd5c2f6b8ea1b4e99eef3c14' in /home/conserva/public_html/includes/cache.inc on line 27.
  • user warning: Table './conserva_drupal/cache_filter' is marked as crashed and should be repaired query: UPDATE cache_filter SET data = '<p>This Weeks Conservative Focus &hellip; Democrats</p>\n<p>When the sacred cow is a pet and you twist her tail, you can expect booing, not mooing, from the cow&rsquo;s friends. That&rsquo;s what happened at the California Democratic Party State Convention in San Francisco over the weekend when two presidential candidates took a turn twisting the cow&rsquo;s tail.<br />\n John Hickenlooper, the former governor of Colorado, and John Delaney, a former congressman from Maryland, learned that anyone trying to inform and persuade best be careful in such a crowd. They misjudged their audience by a mile.</p>\n<p> &ldquo;MEDICARE for All sounds good, but it&rsquo;s actually not good policy, nor good politics,&rdquo; Delaney told the crowd to a flood of boos. He got nary a moo. He tried an amplification to reassure the reasonable, but reason is scarce in a time and place that grooves on slogans and liberal nostrums. &ldquo;We should have universal health care,&rdquo; Delaney persisted, &ldquo;but it shouldn&rsquo;t be the kind of health care that kicks 150 million Americans off their health care.&rdquo; The fierce booing resumed. When Hickenlooper said socialism is nice but the wrong way to persuade an American audience, his remarks were drowned in a chorus of Bronx cheers.<br />\n Joe Biden, the grown-up resting comfortably on a double-digit polling lead over his primary rivals, knew better than to taunt this crowd with good sense. He stayed away. The old pol knew a California crowd would be dominated by activists of the left in a place where there&rsquo;s no center-left. Medicare for All is the soup du jour. So popular is the slogan it&rsquo;s becoming legislative language. Bernie Sanders, Elizabeth Warren and, above all, Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, are the icons who make Democratic hearts flutter this season.</p>\n<p> THE AVERAGE age of the delegates in San Francisco was hard to discern, but it&rsquo;s an educated guess that many of them learned economics and American history from the textbook &ldquo;A People&rsquo;s History of the United States&rdquo; by Howard Zinn, a leftist historian who died in 2010. The book is widely used in both high schools and colleges. It&rsquo;s a volume with lots of misinformation (and disinformation) about how socialism is cool and American capitalism is wicked. It offers economic insights like this: &ldquo;Why should we accept that the &lsquo;talent&rsquo; of someone who writes jingles for an advertising agency, advertising dog food and gets $100,000 a year, is superior to the talent of an auto mechanic who makes $40,000 a year? Who is to say that Bill Gates works harder than the dishwasher in the restaurant he frequents, or that the CEO of a hospital who makes $400,000 a year works harder than the nurse or the orderly in that hospital who makes $30,000 a year? The president of Boston University makes $300,000 a year. Does he work harder than the man who cleans the offices of the university? Talent and hard work are qualitative factors which cannot be measured quantitatively.&rdquo; Many of the kids, alas, eat this up.<br />\n Help is on the way. Wilfred McClay is a history professor at the University of Oklahoma. In an article in the Wall Street Journal, &ldquo;Reclaiming History from Howard Zinn,&rdquo; he argues that simplistic socialist (slogans) parading as critical thinking is not thinking at all, and it&rsquo;s the opportune time to persuade the young to look beyond victimhood, beyond ideology, beyond socialism.<br />\n &ldquo;We historians have for years been supplying an account of the American past that is so unedifyng and lacking in larger perspective that Zinn&rsquo;s sweeping melodrama looks good by comparison,&rdquo; he writes. &ldquo;We can do better.&rdquo;<br />\n He tries to do better with a new history of America, &ldquo;Land of Hope,&rdquo; a deeper examination of that history, arguing for an open mind about changing contexts that require a mastery of detail, and expanding discussions that have been narrowly limited to race, class and gender. His assessment of Christopher Columbus, a favorite foil of the politically correct who scorn Columbus as a plunderer of &ldquo;Native Americans,&rdquo; for example, is fresh, even-handed and lively.<br />\n &ldquo;Columbus had trouble seeing America for the new thing that it was, and could be, and eventually would become,&rdquo; he writes. &ldquo;The fresh start for the world came at a heavy price for those who were already settled on the land, men and women for whom San Salvador was not a New World being discovered but an old and familiar world about to be transformed.&rdquo;</p>\n<p> HISTORY TEACHES by experience, and it&rsquo;s a mistake for both Democrats and Republicans to think that national elections will conform to the ideas of party activists. George McGovern imagined that. His party may be doomed to learn again what he had to learn. A recent Gallup survey found that nearly half of the Democrats polled say they would consider voting for a socialist. You could call it their last boo.</p>\n<p> June 7, 2019</p>\n', created = 1575647810, expire = 1575734210, headers = '', serialized = 0 WHERE cid = '2:18d564b6dd5c2f6b8ea1b4e99eef3c14' in /home/conserva/public_html/includes/cache.inc on line 112.
  • user warning: Table './conserva_drupal/cache_filter' is marked as crashed and should be repaired query: SELECT data, created, headers, expire, serialized FROM cache_filter WHERE cid = '2:d1429c9c3e71dfb094f468f07662decd' in /home/conserva/public_html/includes/cache.inc on line 27.
  • user warning: Table './conserva_drupal/cache_filter' is marked as crashed and should be repaired query: UPDATE cache_filter SET data = '<p>DEMOCRATS: June 7, 2019</p>\n<p>When the sacred cow is a pet and you twist her tail, you can expect booing, not mooing, from the cow&rsquo;s friends. That&rsquo;s what happened at the California Democratic Party State Convention in San Francisco over the weekend when two presidential candidates took a turn twisting the cow&rsquo;s tail.<br />\n John Hickenlooper, the former governor of Colorado, and John Delaney, a former congressman from Maryland, learned that anyone trying to inform and persuade best be careful in such a crowd. They misjudged their audience by a mile.</p>\n<p> &ldquo;MEDICARE for All sounds good, but it&rsquo;s actually not good policy, nor good politics,&rdquo; Delaney told the crowd to a flood of boos. He got nary a moo. He tried an amplification to reassure the reasonable, but reason is scarce in a time and place that grooves on slogans and liberal nostrums. &ldquo;We should have universal health care,&rdquo; Delaney persisted, &ldquo;but it shouldn&rsquo;t be the kind of health care that kicks 150 million Americans off their health care.&rdquo; The fierce booing resumed. When Hickenlooper said socialism is nice but the wrong way to persuade an American audience, his remarks were drowned in a chorus of Bronx cheers.<br />\n Joe Biden, the grown-up resting comfortably on a double-digit polling lead over his primary rivals, knew better than to taunt this crowd with good sense. He stayed away. The old pol knew a California crowd would be dominated by activists of the left in a place where there&rsquo;s no center-left. Medicare for All is the soup du jour. So popular is the slogan it&rsquo;s becoming legislative language. Bernie Sanders, Elizabeth Warren and, above all, Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, are the icons who make Democratic hearts flutter this season.<br />\n The average age of the delegates in San Francisco was hard to discern, but it&rsquo;s an educated guess that many of them learned economics and American history from the textbook &ldquo;A People&rsquo;s History of the United States&rdquo; by Howard Zinn, a leftist historian who died in 2010. The book is widely used in both high schools and colleges. It&rsquo;s a volume with lots of misinformation (and disinformation) about how socialism is cool and American capitalism is wicked. It offers economic insights like this: &ldquo;Why should we accept that the &lsquo;talent&rsquo; of someone who writes jingles for an advertising agency, advertising dog food and gets $100,000 a year, is superior to the talent of an auto mechanic who makes $40,000 a year? Who is to say that Bill Gates works harder than the dishwasher in the restaurant he frequents, or that the CEO of a hospital who makes $400,000 a year works harder than the nurse or the orderly in that hospital who makes $30,000 a year? The president of Boston University makes $300,000 a year. Does he work harder than the man who cleans the offices of the university? Talent and hard work are qualitative factors which cannot be measured quantitatively.&rdquo; Many of the kids, alas, eat this up.</p>\n<p> HELP IS on the way. Wilfred McClay is a history professor at the University of Oklahoma. In an article in the Wall Street Journal, &ldquo;Reclaiming History from Howard Zinn,&rdquo; he argues that simplistic socialist (slogans) parading as critical thinking is not thinking at all, and it&rsquo;s the opportune time to persuade the young to look beyond victimhood, beyond ideology, beyond socialism.<br />\n &ldquo;We historians have for years been supplying an account of the American past that is so unedifyng and lacking in larger perspective that Zinn&rsquo;s sweeping melodrama looks good by comparison,&rdquo; he writes. &ldquo;We can do better.&rdquo;<br />\n He tries to do better with a new history of America, &ldquo;Land of Hope,&rdquo; a deeper examination of that history, arguing for an open mind about changing contexts that require a mastery of detail, and expanding discussions that have been narrowly limited to race, class and gender. His assessment of Christopher Columbus, a favorite foil of the politically correct who scorn Columbus as a plunderer of &ldquo;Native Americans,&rdquo; for example, is fresh, even-handed and lively.<br />\n &ldquo;Columbus had trouble seeing America for the new thing that it was, and could be, and eventually would become,&rdquo; he writes. &ldquo;The fresh start for the world came at a heavy price for those who were already settled on the land, men and women for whom San Salvador was not a New World being discovered but an old and familiar world about to be transformed.&rdquo;</p>\n<p> HISTORY TEACHES by experience, and it&rsquo;s a mistake for both Democrats and Republicans to think that national elections will conform to the ideas of party activists. George McGovern imagined that. His party may be doomed to learn again what he had to learn. A recent Gallup survey found that nearly half of the Democrats polled say they would consider voting for a socialist. You could call it their last boo.</p>\n', created = 1575647810, expire = 1575734210, headers = '', serialized = 0 WHERE cid = '2:d1429c9c3e71dfb094f468f07662decd' in /home/conserva/public_html/includes/cache.inc on line 112.
  • user warning: Table './conserva_drupal/cache_filter' is marked as crashed and should be repaired query: SELECT data, created, headers, expire, serialized FROM cache_filter WHERE cid = '2:022dacd9e770feea23a42da18a410fc6' in /home/conserva/public_html/includes/cache.inc on line 27.
  • user warning: Table './conserva_drupal/cache_filter' is marked as crashed and should be repaired query: UPDATE cache_filter SET data = '<p>MOE BERG: May 31, 2019</p>\n<p>Once upon a time in America, baseball was not only the National Pastime but also the national obsession, an idyl of summer. Every town and city had a team. Abbott and Costello made their bones with their classic routine &ldquo;Who&rsquo;s on First?&rdquo; Baseball was the great equalizer on sandlot and ballpark. Everybody knew the words to &ldquo;Take Me Out to the Ball Game,&rdquo; and everybody shared in the enthusiasm for the home team.</p>\n<p> BASEBALL WAS the great equalizer for Jews in the common excitement of the sports culture, as it eventually would be for blacks and Hispanics. But Detroit fans threw pork chops at Hank Greenberg, the Jewish first baseman for the Tigers who came close to breaking Babe Ruth&rsquo;s home run record that everyone thought would stand forever. He was admired by Jews and Christians alike when he declined, on religious principle, to play on Yom Kippur during a close pennant race.<br />\n Aviva Kempner, the daughter of Holocaust survivors who makes award-winning documentary movies about Jewish heroes in sports, entertainment and education (including Greenberg), has aimed her camera at another Jewish baseball player in a documentary film called &ldquo;The Spy Behind Home Plate.&rdquo; She introduced it on Memorial Day weekend in Washington.<br />\n Moe Berg risked his life as a spy before, during and after World War II. He spent 14 years in the majors, playing for four different teams, including the old Washington Senators when they won the World Series in 1924. The documentary is fascinating and timely, arriving when rank anti-Semitism is emerging again.<br />\n We watch Berg carousing with Ruth and a team of all-stars dispatched to Tokyo before World War II to undercut growing Japanese hostility to America. Japanese fans loved the players, including Berg, but the trip fell short of its worthy goal, like a futile ninth-inning rally. Berg, armed with a movie camera, posed as a visitor to get to the roof of a hospital and took panoramic shots of the city. His film was used in the briefing of B-25 crews who flew the famous &ldquo;thirty seconds over Tokyo&rdquo; in the early days of the war. He later impersonated a student at a lecture in Switzerland led by the chief Nazi scientist at work on an atomic bomb. Berg was armed with a gun and a cyanide pill, and instructed to assassinate the scientist and then swallow the pill if he concluded the Germans were close.</p>\n<p> BERG WAS the original &ldquo;good field, no hit&rdquo; prospect but had a rifle arm on which few runners dared steal a base. He was a student of the game and just about everything else. Casey Stengel called him &ldquo;the brainiest man in baseball,&rdquo; the &ldquo;strangest&rdquo; man he ever knew in baseball. Berg had a priceless gift for handling pitchers. He graduated from Princeton, a brilliant student when &ldquo;Jewish Princetonian&rdquo; was almost an oxymoron. A star on the Princeton diamond, he was invited to join an elite eating club with the stipulation that he not attempt to recruit other Jews. He declined. He eventually mastered eight languages, including Japanese. He read voraciously throughout his life, forming a habit (which particularly endears him to me) of devouring up to 10 newspapers every day, from the front page to the back, and putting what he read to a prodigious memory.<br />\n Anti-Semitism is not what it was when Berg encountered it. A few weeks ago, San Francisco State University, facing a lawsuit by two Jewish students alleging religious discrimination, said it would spend $200,000 to promote &ldquo;viewpoint diversity&rdquo; (including but not limited to Zionist and pro-Israel viewpoints).<br />\n A few college presidents have stood up to mounting anti-Semitism. When the College Council at Pitzer College in California resolved to prevent an exchange of students with the University of Haifa, the president of Pitzer refused to implement the resolution. When a professor at the University of Michigan refused to write a letter of recommendation for a student who had applied to the University of Haifa, the university disciplined him for &ldquo;political unprofessionalism.&rdquo;</p>\n<p> BUT THERE&rsquo;S often a refusal to call the ancient evil for what it is. Democrats in the U.S. House of Representatives watered down a mild rebuke of Rep. Ilhan Omar for saying Israel had &ldquo;hypnotized&rdquo; the world, rewriting it to make it a catchall criticism of everything hateful. Anti-Semitism is often described in the media as the work of right-wing extremists in both Europe and America, but here it&rsquo;s usually the work of radical Muslims and anti-Israel ideologues. Felix Klein, the German minister for monitoring anti-Semitism in Germany, says it&rsquo;s &ldquo;problematic&rdquo; to say whether left or right is to blame. But it&rsquo;s important to denounce anti-Semitism no matter the source, no matter the numbers. It&rsquo;s a lot more serious than &ldquo;who&rsquo;s on first.&rdquo;</p>\n', created = 1575647810, expire = 1575734210, headers = '', serialized = 0 WHERE cid = '2:022dacd9e770feea23a42da18a410fc6' in /home/conserva/public_html/includes/cache.inc on line 112.
  • user warning: Table './conserva_drupal/cache_filter' is marked as crashed and should be repaired query: SELECT data, created, headers, expire, serialized FROM cache_filter WHERE cid = '2:08fbb3611dd35f8efb8d21218f0f7982' in /home/conserva/public_html/includes/cache.inc on line 27.
  • user warning: Table './conserva_drupal/cache_filter' is marked as crashed and should be repaired query: UPDATE cache_filter SET data = '<p>ADVERSITY: May 24, 2019</p>\n<p>Pomp and circumstance depends a lot more on circumstance than pomp. The 396 graduates of Morehouse College in Atlanta learned that in an unforgettable way the other day at their commencement ceremony. The graduates whooped it up with their families and friends, with plenty to whoop it up for. The commencement speaker surprised them with the announcement that he was going to pay off all their student loans.<br />\n Robert F. Smith, a billionaire investor, certainly deserved his honorary degree, and the Class of &lsquo;19 was suddenly freed from burdensome college debt, relieved of monthly payments on their loans. They could now change their calculations for the future.<br />\n &ldquo;We&rsquo;re going to put a little fuel in your bus,&rdquo; he told them, and suddenly, the sun was providing not so much heat as light, a source of driving energy. &ldquo;Let&rsquo;s make sure every class has the same opportunity going forward,&rdquo; he said, &ldquo;because we are enough to take care of our own community.&rdquo;&nbsp;</p>\n<p> IT WAS A moment for taking to heart the exhortation from their benefactor to pursue the American Dream through action, word and deed, for themselves and for those who will follow in their footsteps. The successful investor, who was a large donor to the National Museum of African-American History and Culture on the Mall, added to that history with an investment that could bring big returns for black America.<br />\n Morehouse College was founded as an all-black college two years after the end of the Civil War to educate freed slaves and, in particular, to guide those who wanted to enter the Christian ministry. Its most famous alumnus is Martin Luther King Jr., who showed as a student with mediocre grades that he had a gift for oratory, if not for academics. But he argued in the Maroon Tiger, the college newspaper, that education has both a utilitarian and a moral function, &ldquo;to teach one to think intensively and to think critically.&rdquo; Robert Smith was acting on that acquired wisdom.<br />\n The billionaire&rsquo;s gift was both refreshing and bountiful, running against the cliched and hackneyed rhetoric of many contemporary commencement speeches. He refrained from the vogue of calling for reparations, as did many of the Democratic candidates for president. Smith&rsquo;s gift, estimated to be worth $14 million, is about investing in opportunity in the future, not bemoaning the sins of the past.<br />\n In its beneficence, it outshines the victimization debate in the academy, abetted by The College Board, which administers the SAT exam that largely determines the acceptance rates to elite colleges. The College Board says it will add &ldquo;adversity&rdquo; to the scoring of the exam to make the playing field friendlier for the disadvantaged. Students who suffer socioeconomic deficiencies in three categories &mdash;&nbsp; home, neighborhood and school &mdash; will be rewarded for the unseen circumstances they might have endured, rather than their actual accomplishments. The worse the adversity, the higher the SAT score.</p>\n<p> IF, FOR EXAMPLE, an SAT test taker lives in a high-crime neighborhood, was raised by a single impoverished parent or attended a dreadful school in a low-income neighborhood, misfortune becomes good fortune. Such bizarre math may add up on paper, and even draw attention to real problems. But creating a level playing field this way can create an obstacle course harming those who suffer adversity in privileged circumstances that can&rsquo;t be measured on a victim measuring stick. Consider the adversity of having to care for a disabled sibling while attending a good school, or living with high-income parents who are abusive or remote. The adversity index merely reduces the whole person to the sum of negative parts.<br />\n The SAT initiative poses problems similar to those imposed by affirmative action, discriminating against categories of people not included in the accepted hierarchies of suffering. J.D. Vance, who went to Ohio State University and Yale Law School and wrote the best-selling book &ldquo;Hillbilly Elegy,&rdquo; points out how, on the checklist of affirmative action, he is a big-time loser because he is white, male, straight and Protestant. I have no idea how he scored on his SAT, but the prejudice against him and those like him, despite poverty and hardship, assures his coming up short on sympathy in the measurements of identity politics and the accepted culture of victimhood.<br />\n Critics of Robert Smith&rsquo;s gift to the Morehouse Class of &lsquo;19 complain that it&rsquo;s a one-shot deal and does nothing to solve the larger problem of the high price of college and stultifying debt students incur. True enough.</p>\n<p> BUT AS John F. Kennedy reminded us in a previous century, life is unfair, proving again that where you stand is caused by where you&rsquo;re sitting. One graduate, thrilled by the liberation of being debt-free, told the New York Times, &ldquo;The fact that I know somebody who paid off $98,000 of my student loans makes me just want to go out and just give to people even more than I did before.&rdquo; That&rsquo;s not bad as inspiration, and it beats the bitterness of victimhood.</p>\n', created = 1575647810, expire = 1575734210, headers = '', serialized = 0 WHERE cid = '2:08fbb3611dd35f8efb8d21218f0f7982' in /home/conserva/public_html/includes/cache.inc on line 112.
  • user warning: Table './conserva_drupal/cache_filter' is marked as crashed and should be repaired query: SELECT data, created, headers, expire, serialized FROM cache_filter WHERE cid = '2:1cd77f7184da2bafaa6a089469bc2384' in /home/conserva/public_html/includes/cache.inc on line 27.
  • user warning: Table './conserva_drupal/cache_filter' is marked as crashed and should be repaired query: UPDATE cache_filter SET data = '<div id=\"fb-root\"></div>\n<script>(function(d, s, id) {\n var js, fjs = d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0];\n if (d.getElementById(id)) return;\n js = d.createElement(s); js.id = id;\n js.src = \"//connect.facebook.net/en_US/all.js#xfbml=1&appId=452921018151594\";\n fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js, fjs);\n}(document, \'script\', \'facebook-jssdk\'));</script><div class=\"fb-like-box\" data-href=\"http://www.facebook.com/conservativechronicle\" data-width=\"275\" data-colorscheme=\"light\" data-show-faces=\"true\" data-header=\"true\" data-stream=\"false\" data-show-border=\"true\"></div>\n', created = 1575647810, expire = 1575734210, headers = '', serialized = 0 WHERE cid = '2:1cd77f7184da2bafaa6a089469bc2384' in /home/conserva/public_html/includes/cache.inc on line 112.
  • strict warning: Non-static method view::load() should not be called statically in /home/conserva/public_html/sites/all/modules/views/views.module on line 906.
  • user warning: Table './conserva_drupal/cache_filter' is marked as crashed and should be repaired query: SELECT data, created, headers, expire, serialized FROM cache_filter WHERE cid = '5:26776aa5ca60f6f8eb4e7f92178ff26e' in /home/conserva/public_html/includes/cache.inc on line 27.

Suzanne Fields

09/08/2019 - 8:21pm
SUZANNE FIELDS: September 6, 2019 Saying goodbye is never easy. Every school child quotes “Parting is such sweet sorrow” from “Romeo and Juliet,” which has become a sentimental cliche. But the sentiment captures the memories that sustain my final column. I am saying goodbye to all my readers who stayed with me through these changing times and wrote lively letters with both...
06/15/2019 - 9:58pm
PARENTAL LEAVE: June 14, 2019 Bonding with a newborn baby isn’t just women’s work any longer. Men now say, “What’s good for the goose is good for the gander.” Fathers want in on parental leave. New daddies have no tell-tale stretch marks or breasts overflowing with warm milk, but it’s a sign of the times that...
06/12/2019 - 8:27am
This Weeks Conservative Focus … Democrats When the sacred cow is a pet and you twist her tail, you can expect booing, not mooing, from the cow’s friends. That’s what happened at the California Democratic Party State Convention in San Francisco over the weekend when two presidential candidates took a turn twisting the cow’s...
06/10/2019 - 9:51pm
DEMOCRATS: June 7, 2019 When the sacred cow is a pet and you twist her tail, you can expect booing, not mooing, from the cow’s friends. That’s what happened at the California Democratic Party State Convention in San Francisco over the weekend when two presidential candidates took a turn twisting the cow’s tail. John Hickenlooper...
06/01/2019 - 5:22pm
MOE BERG: May 31, 2019 Once upon a time in America, baseball was not only the National Pastime but also the national obsession, an idyl of summer. Every town and city had a team. Abbott and Costello made their bones with their classic routine “Who’s on First?” Baseball was the great equalizer on sandlot and ballpark. Everybody...
05/27/2019 - 12:13pm
ADVERSITY: May 24, 2019 Pomp and circumstance depends a lot more on circumstance than pomp. The 396 graduates of Morehouse College in Atlanta learned that in an unforgettable way the other day at their commencement ceremony. The graduates whooped it up with their families and friends, with plenty to whoop it up for. The commencement speaker...
Syndicate content