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  • user warning: Table './conserva_drupal/cache_filter' is marked as crashed and should be repaired query: UPDATE cache_filter SET data = '<p>LESLIE&rsquo;S TRIVIA BITS: December 2, 2019</p>\n<p>It&rsquo;s possible that the world&rsquo;s oldest coin-operated machine was a holy water dispenser devised by the ancient Greek engineer Heron of Alexandria. When a coin was inserted, the machine released a stream of water that allowed a worshipper to cleanse himself before entering a temple to pray. Heron also invented mechanical toys, a syringe and a steam-powered engine.</p>\n<p> CHRISTMAS movies capture hearts, but they don&rsquo;t grab many Academy Awards. Even &ldquo;It&rsquo;s a Wonderful Life,&rdquo; that ultimate Christmas classic, had five Oscar nominations but no wins. One film on the short list of Christmas films that won Oscars is &ldquo;How the Grinch Stole Christmas&rdquo; (2000), which brought Rick Baker and Gail Rowell-Ryan an Oscar for best makeup. Edmund Gwenn won best supporting actor for portraying Kris Kringle in &ldquo;Miracle on 34th Street&rdquo; (1947). And a best original song Oscar went to Irving Berlin for &ldquo;White Christmas&rdquo; from &ldquo;Holiday Inn&rdquo; (1942).<br />\n On the morning of the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, Dec. 7, 1941, the repair ship USS Vestal was moored beside the battleship USS Arizona. Two direct bomb hits combined with explosions from the attack on the Arizona blew the Vestal&rsquo;s captain and hundreds of crewmen overboard. Seven crew members were killed, and the ship was severely damaged, but the Vestal wasn&rsquo;t finished. After repairs, it continued in service through the end of World War II.<br />\n Winter isn&rsquo;t typical ice cream season, so Bill and Dorothy Harmsen, owners of the Jolly Rancher ice cream shop in Golden, Colorado, began selling candy to keep sales up during the cold weather. That&rsquo;s how the Jolly Rancher candy company was born. It started with Fire Stix, a flat bar of cinnamon hard taffy. Watermelon, green apple and other flavor &ldquo;stix&rdquo; followed. At one point, the Harmsens estimated they were making a million pounds of candy a week in the Jolly Rancher candy kitchen.</p>\n<p> THE standard playing card suits of clubs, spades, hearts and diamonds originated in France in the 15th century. Earlier German playing card suits were acorns, leaves, hearts and bells. In Switzerland, the suits were (and sometimes still are) acorns, flowers, shields and bells. The oldest suits on playing cards from Italy and Spain are coins, cups, swords and caveman-style clubs, all derived from the Middle East and North Africa, where playing cards originated. Back then, each suit consisted of 10 numbered cards and three face cards: a king, a cavalier and a knave, but no queen.<br />\n We tend to think of all conifer trees, like the spruce, the fir and the pine, as being evergreen, but Mother Nature reliably provides an exception to every rule. Larch, bald cypress and dawn redwood are part of a small group known as deciduous conifers. They produce cones and have needle-like leaves that turn red or gold, drop off in the fall and then regrow fresh and green in spring.</p>\n<p> TRIVIA<br />\n 1. The Seven Wonders of the Ancient World included what type of structure in Alexandria, Egypt?<br />\n A) Lighthouse<br />\n B) Mausoleum<br />\n C) Palace<br />\n D) Pyramid</p>\n<p> 2. According to the classic film, where did the &ldquo;Miracle on 34th Street&rdquo; take place?<br />\n A) Central Park<br />\n B) Empire State Building<br />\n C) Grand Central Terminal<br />\n D) Macy&rsquo;s department store</p>\n<p> 3. Pearl Harbor is located on which Hawaiian island?<br />\n A) Hawaii (the &ldquo;Big Island&rdquo;)<br />\n B) Lanai<br />\n C) Molokai<br />\n D) Oahu</p>\n<p> 4. Which American painter lived at Ghost Ranch in Abiquiu, New Mexico?<br />\n A) Louise Nevelson<br />\n B) Georgia O&rsquo;Keeffe<br />\n C) Jackson Pollock<br />\n D) Gilbert Stuart</p>\n<p> 5. According to legend, what hand was Wild Bill Hickok holding when he was shot during a poker game in 1876?<br />\n A) Full house: aces over tens<br />\n B) Royal flush in diamonds<br />\n C) Straight: king-high<br />\n D) Two pair: black aces and eights</p>\n<p> 6. From 1992 to 1995, the Cones Hotline in the U.K. fielded phone calls from citizens about what subject?<br />\n A) Healthcare<br />\n B) Ice cream trucks<br />\n C) Recycling<br />\n D) Road construction</p>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>\n ANSWERS<br />\n 1) The lighthouse, or pharos, of Alexandria was one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World.<br />\n 2) &ldquo;Miracle on 34th Street&rdquo; centers on Macy&rsquo;s department store.<br />\n 3) Pearl Harbor is on the island of Oahu in Hawaii.<br />\n 4) Georgia O&rsquo;Keeffe had a house at Ghost Ranch in Abiquiu, New Mexico.<br />\n 5) According to legend, Wild Bill Hickok&rsquo;s &ldquo;Dead Man&rsquo;s Hand&rdquo; was two pair: black aces and eights.<br />\n 6) The U.K.&rsquo;s Cones Hotline (as in traffic cones) fielded citizens&rsquo; questions about road construction.</p>\n', created = 1576398404, expire = 1576484804, headers = '', serialized = 0 WHERE cid = '2:03e8fb85507e44d806e26114659cfb68' in /home/conserva/public_html/includes/cache.inc on line 112.
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  • user warning: Table './conserva_drupal/cache_filter' is marked as crashed and should be repaired query: UPDATE cache_filter SET data = '<p>TRIVIA BITS: October 21, 2019</p>\n<p>In 2016, Portugal won the Union of European Footbal Associations soccer championship; superstar player Cristiano Ronaldo topped the Forbes magazine list of the world&rsquo;s highest paid athletes; and the airport in his hometown of Funchal on the island of Madeira was renamed in his honor. With that, Ronaldo joined a short list of athletes with namesake airports. Among others: soccer star George Best in Belfast, Northern Ireland; ancient Olympic boxer Diagoras on the Greek island of Rhodes; and great American golfer Arnold Palmer in Latrobe, Pennsylvania.</p>\n<p> THE TALL, pointed headdress we associate with fairytale princesses is called a &ldquo;hennin.&rdquo; They were all the rage in the mid-15th century, especially in France, where fashionable ladies wore hennins 3 feet tall with a veil attached to the tip. A woman could fold the veil under one arm or let it float behind her like angel wings when she walked. To accentuate the look, she&rsquo;d tuck as much of her hair as she could inside the hennin and then shave off stray strands from her forehead and temples.<br />\n Rabies, swine flu and avian flu are diseases transmitted from animals to humans, often with fatal consequences. But sometimes the transmission goes the other way. Animals in zoos -- especially primates -- have died from influenza and other viruses they picked up from humans. There&rsquo;s even some evidence that humans with H1N1 &ldquo;swine flu&rdquo; passed that virus back to healthy pig population and made them sick, too.</p>\n<p> Before he developed the telegraph and the code that bears his name, Samuel F.B. Morse (F.B. stands for Finley Breese) was an accomplished painter who trained at the Royal Academy of Art in London. His &ldquo;Gallery of the Louvre&rdquo; depicts all of that museum&rsquo;s great works -- including the &ldquo;Mona Lisa&rdquo; -- hung in a single room. His portrait of John Adams -- for which he was paid $25 in 1816 -- is in the collection of the Brooklyn Museum. His portrait of James Monroe hangs in the Blue Room of the White House.<br />\n &ldquo;Candy Land&rdquo; was devised by Eleanor Abbott of San Diego in the 1940s, while she was recuperating from polio. Hard as it was for her to be confined to a hospital ward as an adult, she knew it was even harder for the children there with her. So she invented a board game that could be played to pass the time. The rules were simple enough for 3-year-olds -- no reading required. Abbott pitched the game to Milton Bradley, which brought out its first edition of &ldquo;Candy Land&rdquo; in 1949.</p>\n<p> THE FIRST designated military camouflage unit in modern history was formed in the French army in 1915 under the direction of a painter named Lucien-Victor Guirand de Scevola. Its main objective was to disguise ground artillery so it wouldn&rsquo;t be spotted and destroyed by aerial bombers in World War I. By 1918, the French military camouflage section employed 3,000 officers and troops at the front, plus a few hundred German prisoners of war, and some 10,000 civilian women &ldquo;camoufleurs&rdquo; at a studio in Paris.</p>\n<p> TRIVIA<br />\n 1. Lambert-St. Louis International Airport is named for Albert Bond Lambert, an aviation pioneer with what other distinction?<br />\n A) Major League Baseball player<br />\n B) Olympic athlete<br />\n C) Performed the first successful kidney transplant<br />\n D) U.S. secretary of state</p>\n<p> 2. Cary Elwes, John Cleese, Sean Connery and Russell Crowe all have played what role on screen?<br />\n A) King Henry VIII<br />\n B) Moses<br />\n C) Robin Hood<br />\n D) Sherlock Holmes</p>\n<p> 3. What type of animal is Ranger Rick, the National Wildlife Federation mascot?<br />\n A) Bear<br />\n B) Dog<br />\n C) Raccoon<br />\n D) Skunk</p>\n<p> 4. In Morse code, one dot signifies the letter E. What does one dash signify?<br />\n A) A<br />\n B) O<br />\n C) S<br />\n D) T</p>\n<p> 5. What nonprofit organization was founded by Candy Lightner in Oct. 1980?<br />\n A) Doctors Without Borders<br />\n B) Human Rights Watch<br />\n C) MADD (Mothers Against Drunk Driving)<br />\n D) Teach for America</p>\n<p> 6. What was pictured on the uniform insignias of both the French and American camouflage units in World War I?<br />\n A) Chameleon<br />\n B) Lion<br />\n C) Mask<br />\n D) Paintbrush</p>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>\n ANSWERS<br />\n 1) Albert Bond Lambert won a silver medal in golf at the 1904 Summer Olympics in St. Louis.<br />\n 2) Cary Elwes, John Cleese, Sean Connery and Russell Crowe all have played Robin Hood on screen.<br />\n 3) Ranger Rick is a raccoon.<br />\n 4) One dash in Morse code signifies the letter T.<br />\n 5) Candy Lightner founded MADD (Mothers Against Drunk Driving) in October 1980.<br />\n 6) A chameleon was pictured on insignias of both the French and American camouflage units in World War I.</p>\n', created = 1576398404, expire = 1576484804, headers = '', serialized = 0 WHERE cid = '2:da327abef268e128e4310e7d4d8c5452' in /home/conserva/public_html/includes/cache.inc on line 112.
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  • user warning: Table './conserva_drupal/cache_filter' is marked as crashed and should be repaired query: UPDATE cache_filter SET data = '<p>LESLIE&rsquo;S TRIVIA BITS: October 14, 2019</p>\n<p>When Christopher Columbus was cruising around the West Indies in 1492, he took note of the hanging beds used by the local Taino people. It&rsquo;s possible that his diary entry for Oct. 17, 1492, was the first written mention of those woven cotton sling beds that kept sleeping people off the ground and away from critters and creepy-crawlies at night. The Taino called the beds &ldquo;hamacas,&rdquo; which is where we get the word &ldquo;hammock.&rdquo;</p>\n<p> THE FIRST athlete to host &ldquo;Saturday Night Live&rdquo; was NFL Hall of Fame quarterback Fran Tarkenton. He hosted on Jan. 29, 1977, a couple of weeks after his Minnesota Vikings lost to the Oakland Raiders in Super Bowl XI.<br />\n Two common cross spiders (Araneus diadematus) named Anita and Arabella went into space with NASA astronauts on a Skylab mission in 1973. They were part of an experiment devised by high school student Judith Miles to test whether weightlessness would affect a spider&rsquo;s ability to spin a web. Both spiders spun webs in space once they&rsquo;d acclimated to their extraterrestrial environment. After they died, their bodies were placed in the permanent collection of the Smithsonian.<br />\n The term &ldquo;cliffhanger&rdquo; originated in the 1930s to describe serialized radio shows and silent films that ended at a critical moment &mdash; sometimes literally with a character hanging from a cliff &mdash; to ensure audiences would tune in for the next episode. Its first known use was in a 1931 issue of &ldquo;Variety,&rdquo; the film industry trade magazine known for popularizing the terms &ldquo;biopic,&rdquo; &ldquo;sitcom&rdquo; and &ldquo;striptease,&rdquo; among many others.<br />\n When Lord Horatio Nelson was shot and killed at the Battle of Trafalgar on Oct. 21, 1805, the naval surgeon aboard Nelson&rsquo;s ship, HMS Victory, preserved the body by sealing it in a large cask of brandy. There it remained until it returned to England in December 1805. According to the surgeon&rsquo;s report, when the cask was opened, the &ldquo;undecayed state (of Nelson&rsquo;s body) after a lapse of two months since death ... excited the surprise of all who beheld it.&rdquo;</p>\n<p> THE FIRST female police officer in the United States was Marie Owens, who joined the Chicago Police Department in the 1890s working primarily on abuses of child labor laws. She was, as the Chicago Tribune said, &ldquo;the only woman detective sergeant in the world,&rdquo; but she was just the first. Lola Greene Baldwin became a police officer in Portland, Oregon, in 1908. In 1910, Alice Stebbins Wells joined the Los Angeles Police Department. She received a badge, a rulebook and a first aid manual, but she had to design and sew her own uniform.</p>\n<p> TRIVIA<br />\n 1. The present-day name of what island group comes from the Carib word for a marine crocodile?<br />\n A) Antilles<br />\n B) Bahamas<br />\n C) Cayman Islands<br />\n D) Hebrides<br />\n 2. According to Norse mythology and comic books, Thor carries Mjolnir, which is what type of weapon?<br />\n A) Hammer<br />\n B) Spear<br />\n C) Sword<br />\n D) Whip<br />\n 3. The Saturn V rocket was the launch vehicle for Skylab and which other NASA space program?<br />\n A) Apollo<br />\n B) Gemini<br />\n C) Mercury<br />\n D) Voyager<br />\n 4. What makes the White Cliffs of Dover white?<br />\n A) Agate<br />\n B) Chalk<br />\n C) Paint<br />\n D) Quartz<br />\n 5. Slivovitz is brandy distilled from what fruit?<br />\n A) Apple<br />\n B) Peach<br />\n C) Pear<br />\n D) Plum<br />\n 6. Which of these was NOT an album by The Police?<br />\n A) &ldquo;Argybargy&rdquo;<br />\n B) &ldquo;Outlandos d&rsquo;Amour&rdquo;<br />\n C) &ldquo;Reggatta de Blanc&rdquo;<br />\n D) &ldquo;Zenyatta Mondatta&rdquo;</p>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>\n ANSWERS</p>\n<p> 1) The Cayman Islands take their name from the caiman, a type of crocodile.<br />\n 2) Mjolnir is Thor&rsquo;s hammer.<br />\n 3) The Saturn V rocket was the launch vehicle for the Apollo space program.<br />\n 4) The White Cliffs of Dover are chalk cliffs.<br />\n 5) Slivovitz is plum brandy.<br />\n 6) &ldquo;Argybargy&rdquo; was a 1980 album by Squeeze.</p>\n', created = 1576398404, expire = 1576484804, headers = '', serialized = 0 WHERE cid = '2:d69d7179693bb32798661bdece9a1014' in /home/conserva/public_html/includes/cache.inc on line 112.
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  • user warning: Table './conserva_drupal/cache_filter' is marked as crashed and should be repaired query: UPDATE cache_filter SET data = '<p>LESLIE&rsquo;S TRIVIA BITS: September 30, 2019</p>\n<p>Planning to name your next child for your favorite color, your favorite place or your first car? Parents in some countries, including Argentina, Denmark and Portugal, don&rsquo;t have that option. They must choose a baby name deemed acceptable by their government. Some countries specify acceptable spelling as well. For the most part, such regulations exist to protect children from being saddled with a name that could embarrass them or cause offense to others.</p>\n<p> YOU COULD work your entire career before earning a Nobel Prize, or you could find a less labor-intensive way to acquire one. The 1962 medals awarded to Francis Crick and James Watson for their work on DNA and the one given to economist Simon Kuznets in 1971 are among the 20 or so that have been sold to buyers at auction. American physicist Ernest O. Lawrence&rsquo;s medal for his invention of the cyclotron was stolen in 2007 and later recovered, but the medal awarded to Indian poet Rabindranath Tagore was stolen in 2004, and its whereabouts remain a mystery.<br />\n Szczerbiec, &ldquo;the jagged sword,&rdquo; is the oldest object among the crown jewels of Poland. It probably was made around 1250 for a duke known as Boleslaw the Pious. He passed it down to his daughter Jadwiga. She married the future king of Poland, Wladyslaw the Elbow-High (obviously not a tall man), who used Szczerbiec at his coronation ceremony. Over the centuries, it has been stolen, recovered, claimed by foreign powers and sold to private collectors on a route that took it to Russia, France, England and Canada before its safe return to Wawel Castle in Krakow.<br />\n Redditch, England, calls itself the world&rsquo;s needle-making capital, with a heritage of manufacturing needles for sewing that dates back at least to the 1600s. Needle making was a treacherous occupation for workers, who could become fatally ill from breathing in the fine metal dust produced by the sharpening process. Nevertheless, by the 19th century, thousands of people in and around Redditch were employed making needles, most by the firm of Henry Milward &amp; Sons, which also did a brisk business in fish hooks.<br />\n Wonder Woman was the creation of William Moulton Marston, who also devised the polygraph, aka the lie detector. No wonder her arsenal includes the Lasso of Truth!</p>\n<p> EACH YEAR, more than 600 million (possibly more than 1 billion) birds in North America die by flying into glass windows. Reflections off closed windows in daytime, and interior and exterior lighting at night, can make clear glass windows undetectable to birds in flight. Only habitat loss and cats are responsible for more bird deaths per year.</p>\n<p> TRIVIA<br />\n 1. Which Taylor had a lead role in the &ldquo;Twilight Saga&rdquo; films?<br />\n A) Taylor Hawkins<br />\n B) Taylor Lautner<br />\n C) Taylor Schilling<br />\n D) Taylor Swift<br />\n 2. The vast majority of Nobel Prizes in physiology or medicine have been awarded for research in which field?<br />\n A) Genetics<br />\n B) Nutrition<br />\n C) Parasitology<br />\n D) Virology<br />\n 3. According to legend, who gave King Arthur his sword, Excalibur?<br />\n A) God<br />\n B) The Lady of the Lake<br />\n C) Merlin<br />\n D) Morgan Le Fay<br />\n 4. Mercerizing cotton thread helps it do what?<br />\n A) Absorb dye<br />\n B) Fit through the eye of a needle<br />\n C) Resist breakage<br />\n D) Stretch<br />\n 5. Which is the knot most cowboys use to tie a lasso?<br />\n A) Carrick bend<br />\n B) Clove hitch<br />\n C) Honda knot<br />\n D) Yosemite bowline<br />\n 6. Jazz great Charlie Parker is best known for playing which musical instrument?<br />\n A) Drums<br />\n B) Piano<br />\n C) Saxophone<br />\n D) Trumpet</p>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>\n ANSWERS<br />\n 1. Taylor Lautner starred as Jacob in the &ldquo;Twilight Saga&rdquo; film series.<br />\n 2. The Noble Prize in physiology or medicine has been awarded most often in the field of genetics.<br />\n 3. The Lady of the Lake, sometimes called Nimue, gave King Arthur his sword, Excalibur.<br />\n 4. Mercerizing thread increases its ability to absorb dye.<br />\n 5. A honda knot is used to tie a lasso.<br />\n 6. Jazz great Charlie Parker played the saxophone.<br />\n &nbsp;</p>\n', created = 1576398404, expire = 1576484804, headers = '', serialized = 0 WHERE cid = '2:db1d54a81c4f279081c493a3a6006079' in /home/conserva/public_html/includes/cache.inc on line 112.
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  • user warning: Table './conserva_drupal/cache_filter' is marked as crashed and should be repaired query: UPDATE cache_filter SET data = '<p>LESLIE&rsquo;S TRIVIA BITS: September 23, 2019</p>\n<p>What to give the bride and groom on their wedding day? It&rsquo;s a tough question. For the young Queen Victoria on the occasion of her marriage to Prince Albert, cheesemakers in the West of England collected the milk of 700 dairy cows to produce a wheel of cheddar cheese weighing more than 1,000 pounds that they gave to the couple as a wedding gift.</p>\n<p> MOST NASCAR races give the winner a trophy. Winners at Martinsville Speedway in Virginia take home a grandfather clock. It&rsquo;s among the more coveted prizes in racing, not least because Martinsville is the shortest &mdash; and, some might say, most challenging &mdash; track on the Monster Energy NASCAR Cup Series circuit. On Sept. 27, 1964, Fred Lorenzen became the first driver to win a Martinsville clock. More than 125 have been awarded since then, including 15 to Richard Petty.<br />\n After the United States entered World War I in 1917, men were released from &ldquo;unnecessary peacetime occupations&rdquo; so they could join the war effort. Mowing the White House lawn was considered one such unnecessary occupation, so a flock of sheep temporarily replaced the groundskeepers. (The scheme might have been first lady Edith Wilson&rsquo;s idea.) The sheep kept the grass &mdash; and White House expenses &mdash; trimmed. Their wool was auctioned to benefit the American Red Cross and the Salvation Army.<br />\n Johannes Gutenberg devised the first operable printing press using mechanical moveable type in the 1440s, adapting his design from the wine presses that he would have known well living in Mainz, the heart of German wine country. It took close to 100 years for the first printing press in the New World to be put into operation in Mexico City in 1539. Then another 99 &mdash; possibly an even 100 &mdash; years passed before Harvard College in Cambridge, Massachusetts, opened the first printing press in North America.<br />\n There are lots of tiny frogs in the world, but Paedophryne amauensis is the smallest. It measures just 7.7 mm &mdash; about 0.3 inch &mdash; and can fit on the face of a dime. The Louisiana State University herpetologists who discovered the frog in 2010 heard it before they saw it. While studying the wildlife of Papua New Guinea, they became curious about an odd mating call they heard at night. Turns out the big noise came from a very small source.</p>\n<p> SLOT MACHINES were intended to pay winners in cash. You pop in a nickel, spin the wheels and hope to increase your &ldquo;investment.&rdquo; But that changed temporarily in 1909 when local anti-gambling ordinances were enacted throughout the United States &mdash; even in Las Vegas. Because there was nothing to prohibit machines paying benefits other than cash, some slots were reconfigured to pay off in chewing gum with cherries, melons and other fruit on the wheels indicating the flavor you&rsquo;d get if you won.</p>\n<p> TRIVIA<br />\n 1. Which animated duo helped to revive the popularity of Wensleydale cheese?<br />\n A) Lilo and Stitch<br />\n B) Phineas and Ferb<br />\n C) Pinky and the Brain<br />\n D) Wallace and Grommit</p>\n<p> 2. What chemical element powers the NIST-F2 atomic fountain clock &mdash; guaranteed not to gain or lose one second of time in the next 300 million years?<br />\n A) Cesium<br />\n B) Chromium<br />\n C) Hydrogen<br />\n D) Titanium</p>\n<p> 3. &ldquo;General&rdquo; William Booth founded the Salvation Army in 1865 in what city?<br />\n A) Boston, Massachusetts<br />\n B) Geneva, Switzerland<br />\n C) London, England<br />\n D) Savannah, Georgia</p>\n<p> 4. Which of these is a principal ingredient in mead wine?<br />\n A) Butter<br />\n B) Eggs<br />\n C) Honey<br />\n D) Rice</p>\n<p> 5. In the 1970s, Stephen Sondheim wrote a musical based on &ldquo;The Frogs&rdquo; by what ancient Greek playwright?<br />\n A) Aeschylus<br />\n B) Aristophanes<br />\n C) Euripides<br />\n D) Sophocles</p>\n<p> 6. Which kids&rsquo; game inspired a 1968 smash hit single from the 1910 Fruitgum Company?<br />\n A) Dodgeball<br />\n B) Jacks<br />\n C) Simon Says<br />\n D) Tic-tac-toe</p>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>\n ANSWERS<br />\n 1. Wallace and Grommit helped boost sales of English Wensleydale cheese.<br />\n 2. The NIST-F2 atomic fountain clock is powered by cesium atoms.<br />\n 3. William Booth founded the Salvation Army in London in 1865.<br />\n 4. Mead wine is made with fermented honey.<br />\n 5. &ldquo;The Frogs&rdquo; was a comedy written by Aristophanes in 405 B.C.<br />\n 6. &ldquo;Simon Says&rdquo; was a smash hit for the 1910 Fruitgum Company in 1968.</p>\n', created = 1576398404, expire = 1576484804, headers = '', serialized = 0 WHERE cid = '2:8d4c035f0bd3ebb9c4701cc8335eeb05' in /home/conserva/public_html/includes/cache.inc on line 112.
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  • user warning: Table './conserva_drupal/cache_filter' is marked as crashed and should be repaired query: UPDATE cache_filter SET data = '<p>LESLIE&rsquo;S TRIVIA BITS: September 16, 2019</p>\n<p>Alan Smithee directed a lot of films &mdash; a lot of really bad films. It&rsquo;s a not-so-secret secret that &ldquo;Alan Smithee&rdquo; is a pseudonym used by directors who don&rsquo;t want their names attached to projects that were changed significantly without their consent. Take the 1990 film &ldquo;Catchfire.&rdquo; Despite the fact that it featured Oscar winners Jodie Foster and Joe Pesci, it was such a mess that director Dennis Hopper was credited as Alan Smithee, and Pesci had his name removed from the credits entirely.</p>\n<p> WESTWARD Ho! (the exclamation point is intentional) is a coastal village in Devon, England. Its name comes from the 1855 novel &ldquo;Westward Ho!&rdquo; by Charles Kingsley, the tale of an Elizabethan adventurer who leaves his home in North Devon to travel west (naturally) to the New World. Seeking to capitalize on the book&rsquo;s popularity and to bring tourists to North Devon&rsquo;s sandy beaches, the Westward Ho! family resort was built in the area in the 1860s. Pretty soon the whole area came to be called Westward Ho!<br />\n The three stars that comprise the &ldquo;belt&rdquo; in the constellation Orion are Mintaka, Alnilam and Alnitak. Their names are Arabic, as are the names of other stars in Orion: Meissa, Rigel, Saiph, Bellatrix and Betelgeuse. Even though constellations generally have Latin names, more than 200 individual stars have Arabic names that originated with stargazers in the Muslim world. In fact, the work of 10th-century Persian astronomer Abd al-Rahman al-Sufi is still used as a reference today.<br />\n The Philadelphia Zoological Garden was the first zoo in the United States. Chartered in 1859, then delayed by the Civil War, it opened in 1874 and had 813 animals in residence in its first year. Among them, as one newspaper reported, were &ldquo;four porcupines; two laughing hyenae; two golden leopards, one not quite full grown and tractable, and the other very large and vicious ... twenty-six monkeys, some very large and treacherous and others small and frisky.&rdquo;<br />\n Amtrak&rsquo;s thrice-weekly train service between Chicago and New York is called the Cardinal because it travels through six states on its way to the East Coast &mdash; Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, Kentucky, West Virginia and Virginia &mdash; and the cardinal is the official state bird of all of them.<br />\n Phil Hartman will live forever in reruns of &ldquo;The Simpsons,&rdquo; where he voiced the characters of has-been actor Troy McClure, shyster lawyer Lionel Hutz and many others including Plato, Moses and God. After Hartman&rsquo;s death in 1998, both Troy McClure and Lionel Hutz were retired as a tribute to his work.<br />\n TRIVIA<br />\n 1. A 189-minute version of which sci-fi movie from a Frank Herbert novel is credited to director Alan Smithee, not director David Lynch?<br />\n A) &ldquo;The Andromeda Strain&rdquo;<br />\n B) &ldquo;Dune&rdquo;<br />\n C) &ldquo;Invasion of the Body Snatchers&rdquo;<br />\n D) &ldquo;Solaris&rdquo;</p>\n<p>\n 2. Elizabethan explorer Sir Walter Raleigh made what practice popular in England?<br />\n A) Smoking<br />\n B) Stamp collecting<br />\n C) Tattooing<br />\n D) Vegetarianism</p>\n<p>\n 3. The goal of NASA&rsquo;s Orion mission is to send humans to what celestial destination in the 2030s?<br />\n A) Betelgeuse<br />\n B) Jupiter<br />\n C) Mars<br />\n D) Venus</p>\n<p>\n 4. Who is the main character in &ldquo;If I Ran the Zoo&rdquo; by Dr. Seuss?<br />\n A) Cindy-Lou Who<br />\n B) Foo-Foo the Snoo<br />\n C) Gerald McGrew<br />\n D) Sam-I-Am</p>\n<p>\n 5. Vermonter Ethan Allen is famous for leading a Revolutionary War attack at what site on Lake Champlain?<br />\n A) Bunker Hill<br />\n B) Fort Charlotte<br />\n C) Fort Ticonderoga<br />\n D) Kemp&rsquo;s Landing</p>\n<p>\n 6. Which of these is an example of a Platonic solid?<br />\n A) A football<br />\n B) Icicles<br />\n C) Ketchup<br />\n D) A Rubik&rsquo;s cube</p>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>\n ANSWERS<br />\n 1. The 189-minute Alan Smithee cut of &ldquo;Dune&rdquo; is a film-geek cult classic.<br />\n 2. Sir Walter Raleigh helped make smoking fashionable in Elizabethan England.<br />\n 3. NASA&rsquo;s Orion mission has a goal of sending humans to Mars.<br />\n 4. Gerald McGrew is the main character in Dr. Seuss&rsquo;s &ldquo;If I Ran the Zoo.&rdquo;<br />\n 5. Ethan Allen and the Green Mountain Boys of Vermont led an attack on Fort Ticonderoga.<br />\n 6. Cubes are among the 3D &ldquo;Platonic solid&rdquo; figures that Plato described circa 350 B.C.</p>\n', created = 1576398404, expire = 1576484804, headers = '', serialized = 0 WHERE cid = '2:52e3e77f4d48022e63547b1cc97a3c62' in /home/conserva/public_html/includes/cache.inc on line 112.
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Leslie Elman

12/04/2019 - 6:22pm
LESLIE’S TRIVIA BITS: December 2, 2019 It’s possible that the world’s oldest coin-operated machine was a holy water dispenser devised by the ancient Greek engineer Heron of Alexandria. When a coin was inserted, the machine released a stream of water that allowed a worshipper to cleanse himself before entering a temple to pray. Heron also invented mechanical toys, a syringe and a...
10/22/2019 - 9:12pm
TRIVIA BITS: October 21, 2019 In 2016, Portugal won the Union of European Footbal Associations soccer championship; superstar player Cristiano Ronaldo topped the Forbes magazine list of the world’s highest paid athletes; and the airport in his hometown of Funchal on the island of Madeira was renamed in his honor. With that, Ronaldo joined a...
10/16/2019 - 12:30pm
LESLIE’S TRIVIA BITS: October 14, 2019 When Christopher Columbus was cruising around the West Indies in 1492, he took note of the hanging beds used by the local Taino people. It’s possible that his diary entry for Oct. 17, 1492, was the first written mention of those woven cotton sling beds that kept sleeping people off the ground and...
10/02/2019 - 11:40am
LESLIE’S TRIVIA BITS: September 30, 2019 Planning to name your next child for your favorite color, your favorite place or your first car? Parents in some countries, including Argentina, Denmark and Portugal, don’t have that option. They must choose a baby name deemed acceptable by their government. Some countries specify acceptable...
09/23/2019 - 3:07pm
LESLIE’S TRIVIA BITS: September 23, 2019 What to give the bride and groom on their wedding day? It’s a tough question. For the young Queen Victoria on the occasion of her marriage to Prince Albert, cheesemakers in the West of England collected the milk of 700 dairy cows to produce a wheel of cheddar cheese weighing more than 1,000...
09/16/2019 - 3:45pm
LESLIE’S TRIVIA BITS: September 16, 2019 Alan Smithee directed a lot of films — a lot of really bad films. It’s a not-so-secret secret that “Alan Smithee” is a pseudonym used by directors who don’t want their names attached to projects that were changed significantly without their consent. Take the 1990 film...
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